Salvation Army thrift store in Farmington to close for good this weekend

The thrift store will close at 4 p.m. on Oct. 30

Joshua Kellogg
Farmington Daily Times
  • The Family Thrift Store at 316 W. Animas St. in Farmington has lost about $65,000 since the start of 2020.
  • Multiple factors were cited for the store closing including the COVID-19 pandemic and a decrease of sales.
  • The workers who will lose their positions at the store have been hired on as paid kettle workers for the holiday season.

FARMINGTON — The Farmington Salvation Army thrift store is shutting down this weekend. The nonprofit states the store has been operating at a loss for years.

The Family Thrift Store at 316 W. Animas St. in Farmington will close its doors at 4 p.m. on Oct. 30, according to Lt. Christopher Rockwell, the Corps Officer for the Salvation Army Farmington Corps Community Center.

Rockwell told The Daily Times the store has lost about $65,000 since the start of 2020.

The store lost about $35,000 in 2020 and has lost about $30,000 so far in 2021. Rockwell didn’t share exact figures, but he said the store has been losing money for about five to six years.

“Closing the store was not an easy decision, but it was the most fiscally responsible one for our long-term viability in Farmington and The Salvation Army’s mission of helping our neighbors in need,” said Salvation Army Southwest Divisional Commander Lt. Colonel Ivan Wild in a news release

Salvation Army Family Thrift Store Warehouse Manager Philip Umbarger sorts through merchandise in the store's warehouse on Oct. 27.

On the afternoon of Oct. 27 the store had two or three customers. Customers could fill a small or large bag with clothing and pay a flat $5 or $10 for all the clothing they could fit inside.

Rockwell cited multiple factors for the store closing, including the COVID-19 pandemic and a decrease of sales. He added the location on West Animas Street doesn’t have a lot of foot traffic.

“The takeaway with the store is allowing us to shift to more local resources and more local needs,” Rockwell said. 

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San Juan United Way Executive Director Cathryn Abeyta told The Daily Times the COVID-19 pandemic has made a lot of nonprofits rethink how they operate.

“I’m really happy for them to divert more resources and energy into direct services,” Abeyta said.

The closure comes as the local Salvation Army chapter prepares for the holiday season with its kettle campaign set to start in mid-November, followed by its Thanksgiving meal and Christmas toy distribution.

The workers who will lose their positions at the store have been hired on as paid kettle workers for the holiday season, Rockwell said.

Salvation Army Family Thrift Store employee Rebekka Luna wipes down the store on Oct. 27. The location is set to close on Oct. 30 after losing the nonprofit money for several years.

This year’s Thanksgiving meal will be served in-person at the Sycamore Park Community Center. To-go meals were prepared and served to the community from Daily Bread at 405 S. Behrend Ave. for Thanksgiving last year.

Members of the community should also expect to see its Angel Tree program popping up in locations around the area soon.

For the future, some of the areas Rockwell would like to focus on include its recovery ministry for those who struggle with drug and alcohol addiction.

The non-profit will continue to collect clothing for the community with the aim of providing clothing to the homeless population and disadvantaged youth.

Joshua Kellogg covers breaking news for The Daily Times. He can be reached at 505-564-4627 or via email at jkellogg@daily-times.com.

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