Farmington schools establishes Community to Teacher Pipeline for educator development

The project is funded by a $300,000 grant over three years

Joshua Kellogg
Farmington Daily Times
An Aug. 5 photo shows first year teachers for Farmington Municipal Schools preparing for the new school year outside district offices at the 30th Street Education Center in Farmington. A new grant will help district officials build stronger ties with the community and help bring more teachers into the classroom.
  • The three-year grant will help district officials increase the number of qualified candidates who wish to become a teacher.
  • The district is working with San Juan College ENgaging LAtino Communities for Education (ENLACE) and Boys and Girls Club of Farmington in the initial phase of the project.
  • The program is starting with two candidates, with the goal of expanding it to more candidates in the future.

FARMINGTON — Farmington schools is continuing its efforts to bring more teachers into the classroom with a new multi-year project to help build stronger ties with the community.

Farmington Municipal Schools announced on Aug. 5 a new Community to Teacher Pipeline project, funded by a $300,000 grant from the W.K. Kellogg Foundation.

The three-year grant will help district officials increase the number of qualified candidates who wish to become a teacher.

“The benefits of a community to teacher pipeline program also include providing employment, training, and security through a career that offers benefits and retirement,” Farmington Municipal Schools Superintendent Gene Schmidt said in a statement.

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The district's Executive Director of Curriculum, Instruction and Federal Programs Nicole Lambson told The Daily Times the “pipeline” is one of the ways the district is trying to expand its recruitment efforts.

The district is working with San Juan College ENgaging LAtino Communities for Education (ENLACE) and Boys and Girls Club of Farmington in the initial phase of the project.

“Our whole goal and vision is that those people employed by the Boys and Girls Club, or who worked through ENLACE who are wanting to have more opportunities in the educational setting, will then be referred to us,” Lambson said.

The structure of the program is still being formulated but the goal is to give candidates in the program a year of experience similar to an internship to ensure that education is the field they want to be in.

“Then they'll have to get a reference or a recommendation from maybe one of their supervisors or a community partner, and then we'll work with them to get enrolled into their classes and start working on their teacher licensure,” Lambson said.

The program is starting with two candidates, with the goal of expanding it to more candidates in the future.

The two candidates became interested in a career in early education while participating in the Parent Liaison and Ready! for Kindergarten parental outreach programs

Another part of the project is increasing parental engagement in their child’s learning by expanding the number of parent liaisons and youth development professionals over the next three years.

The goal is to have a parent representative at each school in the district. 

Farmington schools will also develop a resource center for teachers and other participants with information about scholarship and funding opportunities to enter school or continue higher education.

Joshua Kellogg covers breaking news for The Daily Times. He can be reached at 505-564-4627 or via email at jkellogg@daily-times.com.

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