Do you know what to do if you see something bad happening? Here are some tips. Keri Hensley/USA TODAY NETWORK Wochit

Student had no actual plans for an armed attack, police say


FARMINGTON — A 15-year-old Aztec High School student has been arrested after making a threat to “shoot up” the school this morning.

Aztec Municipal School District Superintendent Kirk Carpenter said two students reported the threat to the school's main office this morning, and Aztec Police Lt. Joseph Gonzalez said the school resource officer was notified just before 10 a.m. today.

The suspect was taken into custody and questioned about the incident before he was arrested and transported to San Juan County's juvenile detention center, according to an APD press release.

Gonzales said police found no evidence that the student had actual plans for an armed attack.

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Charges against the 15-year-old male had not been filed in 11th Judicial Court by mid-afternoon, according to Gonzalez. If charged, the suspect likely will face a misdemeanor charge of interference with the educational process.

Gonzalez said the incident — one of several threatsof violence in schools throughout the region in the past couple of weeks — illustrates the importance of the policy to say something if you hear or see anything threatening.

“At this point, anymore, it’s very important,” Gonzales said of the policy. “We take (threats) very seriously, and we’re trying to get the kids to do the same thing. We take it seriously. It’s not a joke.”

Aztec police urged families to have conversations about "the serious nature of what has occurred all over the nation and what is not appropriate to talk about in school," according to a Facebook post.

Carpenter said "there's no room for those kind of threats" in schools, and emphasized the importance of the "see something, say something policy," both online and in person.

"You can’t joke about threats," Carpenter said. "If kids hear something or see something that they think might be wrong, report it. It’s not about tattle tailing — it’s about keeping our kids and schools safe."

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