Chicago Bears wide receiver Brandon Marshall catches a ball during warmups before an NFL game against the Minnesota Vikings in Chicago, Nov. 25, 2012.
Chicago Bears wide receiver Brandon Marshall catches a ball during warmups before an NFL game against the Minnesota Vikings in Chicago, Nov. 25, 2012. (Charles Rex Arbogast/AP)

Brandon Marshall sees possible redemption for Titus Young, who has been arrested three times in less than a week. However, Young must get help.

The Chicago Bears wide receiver talked to Trey Wingo on ESPN's NFL Live on Monday about Young, the former Detroit Lions wide receiver.

"A guy like Titus, I hear people say his career is over. Well first of all, it's really not about his career right now, it's about his life,'' Marshall said. "And second of all, if he gets that in order, we'll be looking at a success story, and this is a guy who will be in the locker room and guys will be coming to him for advice.''

Marshall understands Young's situation more than most because he was diagnosed with borderline personality disorder a few years ago. He got treatment and now is an advocate for mental health.

"Months back, I wanted to get my hands on Titus, just sit down with him and possibly walk him into the doors of the same program I was in,'' Marshall said on the show. "But I think there were some things in the way that kept us both from moving forward. And I am disappointed in that because, since then, it's just gotten worse and one of the things I stress was without the proper treatment, it's just going to make things worse.''

Young was arrested twice on May 5, first for driving under the influence, and later in the day for burglary when he was trying to steal back his black Mustang from an impound lot in Moreno Valley, Calif.

On Friday night he was arrested on charges of burglary, assaulting a police officer and resisting arrest in San Clemente, Calif.

Marshall's advice for Young is to get the right people around him and then find the right treatment plan.

"Mental health in itself is so stigmatized and it's a taboo topic in our homes and our communities, and we need more people to talk about it and not make Titus Young or people like myself or others who can't fight for themselves a national punch line,'' Marshall said.

Marshall said that every case is different.

"With Titus, I see this not only with guys across the league, but I see this in so many of our communities ... it's one of those situations where you don't always have to be diagnosed with a disorder,'' Marshall said. "Say if there's nine traits of a disorder, it may take five to be diagnosed, well, you can have two of those traits not working properly in your life and it can make your life into a living hell.

"So, guys like Titus Young, it doesn't necessarily mean he has to be diagnosed, but if we're not treating these cases properly, it just gets worse,'' Marshall added.

Young is in jail on a $75,000 bond awaiting his arraignment on Tuesday.

Young was a second-round pick by the Lions in 2011 out of Boise State. The Lions were well aware of Young's issues in college — he was suspended for nearly all of his sophomore season.

He was released by the Lions on Feb. 4 after a tumultuous 2012 season that started when he sucker-punched teammate Louis Delmas and continued until he lined up in the wrong spots in a Nov. 18 loss to the Green Bay Packers.

On the booking report Young's occupation is listed as unemployed.