Mercedes Silvia walks with her goat, Hurley, on Thursday during the goat costume contest at the San Juan County Fair at McGee Park in Farmington.
Mercedes Silvia walks with her goat, Hurley, on Thursday during the goat costume contest at the San Juan County Fair at McGee Park in Farmington. (Jon Austria — The Daily Times)

FARMINGTON — Noelani Meador's goat wore a tight pink slip spotted in sequins.

"She's one of the ladies you see dance in the bars," said the 10-year-old girl, kneeling next to her goat.

Noelani wore a costume of her own — a brown dress, billowing shirt and sun hat strewn in fabric flowers that the black-spotted goat was trying to eat.

"They don't usually eat the clothes," Noelani said, standing up.

The duo represented "Centuries of Ladies," their team name during the San Juan County Fair goat costume contest on Thursday evening at McGee Park.

Three decades ago, the contest started as "just something for the kids to do," said the event's founder, Patty Chick, who has worn a costume and strutted her goat many times in the ring. It's an opportunity, she said, for ranchers and city folk to have fun.

Carolyn Shannon, of Farmington, holds her goat, Zeus, on Thursday during the goat costume contest at the San Juan County Fair at McGee Park in Farmington.
Carolyn Shannon, of Farmington, holds her goat, Zeus, on Thursday during the goat costume contest at the San Juan County Fair at McGee Park in Farmington. Shannon's theme was Athena and Zeus. (Jon Austria — The Daily Times)

In the ring on Thursday, a sign that read "Dinner is served" hung off a goat shuffling through woodchips beside a girl dressed as a chef.

Another goat in the next round wore water wings around its front feet and goggles on its forehead, and a girl followed it with a pool noodle under her arm.

One goat bounded across the ring wearing a bloody white shirt. A girl walked next to it, carrying a samurai sword.

"They're really fun," Noelani said about goats, after winning first place in her age category. "You can get milk from them and turn it into cheese."

David Meador, her father, said he bought two goats four years ago, but now his family of seven — soon to be eight — has six goats. The Bloomfield residents keep the females and sell the males, sometimes for $150. He said it's a way for his kids to make money.

Back in the ring, a little goat entered in an elephant costume. The disguise sagged and bounced as the black goat skittered about, seemingly nervous as the crowd of more than 40 clapped, cheered and laughed from the stands.

A woman dressed in a red jacket, white pants, black boots and a mouse nose and ears jumped behind the goat, her arms outstretched and hands flapping.

The elephant and mouse won first in one of the age categories.

"Thank you folks for coming," said the giant mouse named Sally Hood, "and I hope you come next year to watch all of us make fools of ourselves."

Dan Schwartz covers government for The Daily Times. He can be reached at 505-564-4606 and dschwartz@daily-times.com. Follow him @dtdschwartz on Twitter.