FARMINGTON — Several festival attendees stopped by Akabana Morales' booth on Friday to admire his handcrafted jewelry and flutes.

Morales was among the vendors at Friday's Indian Market and Festival at Berg Park. The Farmington Indian Center organizes the annual event, which is now in its 13th year. Each year, the market and festival features a number of performers from various Native American cultures. Vendors also sell their wares, including art, jewelry and textiles.

The festival continues Saturday.

In addition to selling his goods, Morales is also performing at the festival. As people admired the items on his table, he picked up a bird-shaped whistle and demonstrated a bird call.

Akabana Morales, of Albuquerque, plays the sampoña flute at his tent on Friday during the Indian Market and Festival at Berg Park in Farmington.
Akabana Morales, of Albuquerque, plays the sampoña flute at his tent on Friday during the Indian Market and Festival at Berg Park in Farmington. (Alexa Rogals — The Daily Times)

He then put the whistle aside, exchanging it for a sampoña flute. The flute is similar to a pan flute and has two series of pipes. Morales then began to play the flute, which he said is a popular instrument in his native country of Ecuador.

Morales now lives in Albuquerque and was invited to participate in the festival. His brother makes the flutes being sold at the market, and Morales creates the jewelry.

He was not the only flautist who played at the festival on Friday. Miss Farmington Indian Shenoa Jones also played the flute after giving the opening address.

Jones said she enjoys seeing a variety of performances at the festival.

"It brings people together, and it has beautiful performances and arts and crafts," Jones said.

After she finished playing the flute, Miss Northern Navajo Nation Megan Bedonie spoke to the crowd.

"It's events like this that bring different arts from the local area together," Bedonie said.

On Friday afternoon, Elizabeth Whitehat and her adult daughters, Danialle and Keithley Whitehat, sat in the park's grass and watched Bedonie sing traditional Navajo dance songs.

"It's been a while since I've been out here," Elizabeth Whitehat said.

Danialle Whitehat said the three women came to the event because they wanted to do something as a family.

"It's always nice to know a lot of other cultures," she said.

IF YOU GO 

What: Indian Market and Festival

When: 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. Saturday

Where: Berg Park, 400 Scott Ave., Farmington 

More info: Go to fmtn.org/indiancenter

Hannah Grover covers news, arts and religion for The Daily Times. She can be reached at 505-564-4652 and hgrover@daily-times.com. Follow her @hmgrover on Twitter.