Courtesy of Farmington MuseumFrom left, Stan Ewing and Don Higgins work the ticket booth at Ricketts Park in Farmington during the Connie Mack World Series
Courtesy of Farmington Museum From left, Stan Ewing and Don Higgins work the ticket booth at Ricketts Park in Farmington during the Connie Mack World Series in 1976.

FARMINGTON — The Farmington Museum at Gateway Park is gearing up for the 50th anniversary of the Connie Mack World Series with a series of free, baseball-themed outdoor movies.

The first of the three films — "Field of Dreams," the 1989 drama starring Kevin Costner — was screened Saturday. "A League of Their Own," which is based on the All-American Girls Professional Baseball League, will be shown this week, and baseball classic "The Sandlot" will finish out the three-part series.

The world series kicks off on Aug. 1.

In addition to movies, the museum is hosting an exhibit featuring photos and memorabilia from decades of world series games and festivities. The exhibit opens Saturday.

Ricketts Park, home of the Connie Mack World Series, is seen on July 16. The world series, which is gearing up for its 50th anniversary, kicks off on Aug.
Ricketts Park, home of the Connie Mack World Series, is seen on July 16. The world series, which is gearing up for its 50th anniversary, kicks off on Aug. 1. (Jon Austria — The Daily Times)

"There've been a lot of people play here from all over and actually several major league baseball players came out of the Connie Mack," the museum's curator of exhibits, Tom Cunningham, said on Saturday after setting up "Field of Dreams" for families spread out on the museum lawn.

Players including Ken Griffey Jr., Barry Larkin, Manny Ramirez and Edgar Martinez played in the world series as teenagers. Griffey and Larkin — as well as 1982 Farmington High School graduate Duane Ward, Aztec native Larry Harlow and former Kansas City Royals manager Tony Muser — will be inducted into the Connie Mack World Series Hall of Fame this year.

When museum staff met to map out their plans for the 50th anniversary of the series, they discovered the city owns a large screen.

"We thought maybe we ought to show some movies as a prelude to Connie Mack," Cunningham said.

The museum chose movies that are rated G or PG to make the event family-friendly.

"We just went with what we thought people would enjoy," Cunningham said.

Bristol Cantor attended Saturday's movie with her family and dog. She said they found out about the event online and thought it would be fun for their kids. The family had not yet seen "Field of Dreams," but they enjoy baseball. Cantor said her daughters play softball and her younger brother plays baseball.

She also enjoyed the setting for the movies.

"I think they should use this area more," she said. "It's a beautiful area."

Hannah Grover covers news, arts and religion for The Daily Times. She can be reached at 505-564-4652 and hgrover@daily-times.com. Follow her @hmgrover on Twitter.