FARMINGTON — Justin Hunt first established himself as a filmmaker with a documentary about meth use.

He is continuing to raise awareness about meth use in his upcoming film, "Far Too Far."

During the making of the first film, "Meth Monster," Hunt lived in houses with meth users.

When he finished that documentary, he said many of the stories stuck with him.

He started writing a screenplay for his first narrative feature film, "Far Too Far," seven years ago, after finishing the documentary.

"In a sense, I kind of needed to purge those stories and to get them out," he said.

Hunt's involvement in raising awareness about meth use began in 2004, when the Leadership San Juan class contracted him to make "Meth Monster," a documentary about meth use in San Juan County.

Justin Hunt holds up a copy of his documentary film "Meth Monsters" in 2006 in Farmington.
Justin Hunt holds up a copy of his documentary film "Meth Monsters" in 2006 in Farmington. (Daily Times file photo)

Filming "Meth Monster" led him to start a larger project, "American Meth," which won various awards including "Best Documentary" at the Cinema City International Film Festival in Los Angeles; "Most Socially Engaging" at the Eugene (Oregon) International Film Fest; and second place in "Best Cultural Issues" at the Montana CINE International.

"Far Too Far" features all Farmington-area actors and locations. Filming begins June 15 and will continue through July 15.

Hunt expects to take the film to festivals in 2015 before releasing it.

He is currently looking for help making the film, including extras, vehicles made before 1993 and people with experience in hair, make-up and special effects.

Hunt said the meth-related drama focuses on a single mom who has made bad decisions and gets an opportunity for redemption.

He said he decided to return to Farmington to make the film because of access to locations and the relationships he has built with people. These relationships have led to people volunteering time and property to the project.

"I'm a Farmington son and I think that Farmington knows that I'm one of theirs and wants to see me succeed," he said.

Hunt said this support has been humbling. He said everyone involved in making the film has the same goal.

"We are trying to show that you don't have to leap through the Hollywood hoops to get a film made," he said.

LEND A HAND

There are several opportunities for participation in “Far Too Far.”

The film currently needs extras, vehicles and people with experience in hair, make-up and special effects.

If interested, contact Carrie Olson at carrieolson88@hotmail.com.

Hannah Grover covers news, arts and religion for The Daily Times. She can be reached at 505-564-4652 and hgrover@daily-times.com. Follow her @hmgrover on Twitter.