FARMINGTON — Farmington City Council in a Tuesday morning work session will discuss its $55 million capital improvement plan as it updates the city budget.

The capital improvement plan is a five-year projection of projects that need to be prioritized in the budget, Administrative Services Director Andy Mason said.

In fiscal year 2015, there are about $55 million in capital improvement projects, he said.

These include, among many other projects, storm drainage repairs, street resurfacing, traffic signal improvements and park upgrades, he said. The report listing all the projects is 305 pages long.

Vehicles on Jan. 4 travel along the intersection of East Main Street and Piñon Hills Boulevard. The 19 million Piñon Hills bridge and extension is the No.
Vehicles on Jan. 4 travel along the intersection of East Main Street and Piñon Hills Boulevard. The 19 million Piñon Hills bridge and extension is the No. 1 priority listed on the city of Farmington's capital improvement plan. (Daily Times file photo)

The plan also includes five high-priority projects on the city's fiscal year 2015-2019 infrastructure capital improvement plan. Those projects, in order of importance listed on the plan, are the Piñon Hills bridge and extension at $19 million, Porter Arroyo detention pond at $1.5 million, Fire Station No. 7 and associated equipment at $4 million, waterline replacements at $6 million, and phase two of the Civic Center's expansion at $3.6 million.

"We put that out there," Mason said, "but there's just not enough funds to do everything."

Some projects will remain unfunded, and that is a reality for every city, he said.


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"Unfunded water projects listed as critical infrastructure include 50-year-old water lines that are on the replacement schedule," he wrote in an email, "but there are not sufficient funding resources to accomplish replacing 72 miles of 50-year-old lines with an estimated price tag of $66 million."

Each mile of water line since 2007 has cost the city $923,000, he said. Replacing 12 miles of lines in the past three years cost $11.3 million, he said.

In the city, there is 325 miles of line that needs to be replaced, he said.

City Manager Rob Mayes and Mason will introduce the improvement plan to the city council.

If you go:

What: Farmington City Council work session meeting
When: 9 a.m. Tuesday
Where: City Hall, 800 Municipal Drive, Farmington
More info: Go to www. fmtn.org.

Dan Schwartz covers government for The Daily Times. He can be reached at 505-564-4606 and dschwartz@daily-times.com. Follow him @Dan_J_Schwartz on Twitter.