Farmington Police Chief Steve Hebbe, left, talks with officers last week at Farmington High School. The school was placed on lockdown after a report that a
Farmington Police Chief Steve Hebbe, left, talks with officers last week at Farmington High School. The school was placed on lockdown after a report that a man with a knife had entered the school. The knife was sheathed and, according to reports, the man did not threaten anyone. (Megan Farmer — The Daily Times)

FARMINGTON — Steve Hebbe took over as chief of Farmington police on Monday.

City Manager Rob Mayes will swear in Hebbe during Tuesday's city council meeting.

Hebbe, who was formerly a deputy chief of the Anchorage Police Department in Alaska, was unable for an interview on Monday, said Georgette Allen, a Farmington police spokeswoman.

Hebbe responded to several police functions in Farmington last week. On Wednesday, he arrived at Farmington High School with Farmington Fire Chief Terry Page when the school was placed on lockdown after a man entered the building with a knife sheathed on his belt.

On Friday, he was at Piedra Vista High School where students gave police officials blankets as part of a senior project. Police officers will give children the blankets when they respond to a call for service in hopes that the blanket comforts the child, according to a news release.

Mayes hired Hebbe in January after he was interviewed along with seven other candidates by several panels of residents and officials on Jan. 9 at the Farmington Civic Center.

"Mr. Hebbe's qualifications and experience to lead an effective police force and ensure public safety, his ability to reach out to the community by being highly visible and listening to the public, and his commitment to transparency and accountability made him the standout candidate in a field of highly qualified applicants," Mayes said in a prepared statement that announced Hebbe was hired.

Like Farmington, Anchorage is a hub for many Native Americans who live there and visit and Hebbe created outreach programs that improved relations between them and the department, Hebbe said in documents Mayes referred to during the hiring process.

Hebbe also said in the documents that he started a program in Anchorage that required all police supervisors to do 80 hours of internal affairs training.

Hebbe will make $123,500 per year.


Ryan Boetel covers crime for The Daily Times. He can be reached at 505-564-4644 and rboetel@daily-times.com. Follow him on Twitter @rboetel on Twitter.