COOKIE LOCATOR:

Find out where Girl Scouts are selling cookies at cookielocator.littlebrownie.com

FARMINGTON — Last week, Kaylin McLiverty, 12, counted out cookie boxes as her mother read the orders aloud to her.

Carrying the correct number of Thin Mints and Samoas, the mother and daughter duo rang the door bell of their neighbor's house to deliver the cookies.

"Our neighbors are really good about supporting the girl scouts," said Kaylin's mother, Kristen McLiverty.

Last week, Kaylin joined Girl Scouts around New Mexico in delivering ordered cookies to their eager recipients. The Girl Scouts started booth sales at 4 p.m. Friday, and they will continue through March 30. Each box costs $3.75.

Girl Scout Kaylin McLiverty delivers Girl Scout cookie orders on Wednesday for Linda Petty and her husband, Lawrence, at their home in Farmington.
Girl Scout Kaylin McLiverty delivers Girl Scout cookie orders on Wednesday for Linda Petty and her husband, Lawrence, at their home in Farmington. (Jon Austria /The Daily Times)

In addition to buying cookies for themselves, people can also pay for cookies and donate them to the Blue Star Mothers, an organization of mothers whose children serve in the military. The Girl Scouts of New Mexico Trails headquarters in Albuquerque handles those cookie donations and ships the boxes overseas to the troops.

Delivering cookies can be a challenge. The McLiverty family climbed into their car Wednesday evening with boxes of cookies filling the trunk. Kaylin and her mother got out at each stop to unload the cookies and take them door-to-door.

It isn't uncommon for the McLivertys to turn the cookie delivery into a family adventure. With the cold breeze Wednesday evening, the family decided driving would be easier than walking, their usual mode of transportation.

"We usually try to take a wagon or something," Kristen McLiverty said.

Kaylin, a girl scout with Troop No. 10408 out of Farmington, started her cookie delivery Wednesday.

The cookie sales are the main fundraiser for the scouts and pay for many of their activities. Last year, Kaylin spent a week in Disneyland with the girl scouts, and, two weeks ago, her troop went sledding and to the hot springs in Pagosa Springs, Colo. Money raised from cookie sales helped pay for all of those activities.

Girl Scout Kaylin McLiverty and her mother, Kristen McLiverty, deliver Girl Scout cookie orders on Wednesday in Farmington.
Girl Scout Kaylin McLiverty and her mother, Kristen McLiverty, deliver Girl Scout cookie orders on Wednesday in Farmington. (Jon Austria /The Daily Times)

Last year, Kaylin sold 1,540 boxes of cookies — her personal best.

This year, she hopes to reach 1,000 boxes. So far, she's at 300. Most of her selling took place when she went door-to-door selling cookies the weekend of Super Bowl Sunday, when not many people were home in her neighborhood.

With booth sales underway, Kaylin hopes to quickly increase her numbers. She plans to sell at as many booth sales as possible.

"If you do the majority of them, you probably could get at least 500 boxes or so," she said.

Kaylin has been a girl scout since she was a Daisy — the youngest level in the scouts. She is now a Cadette, the middle school-aged group.

Kaylin joined the Girl Scouts in first grade, when her family moved to Pagosa Springs. Her mom decided to become an assistant troop leader to meet more people.

In 2009, the McLivertys moved to Farmington. Because there wasn't a troop in their area, Kristen McLiverty started one. Over time, the troop dwindled to only two girls until it eventually dissolved. Kaylin joined Troop 10408 this year, and her mom became the assistant troop leader.

Bill McLivety, Kaylin's father, has been impressed with the skills Girl Scouts has taught his daughter.

Some of these skills, he said, are a direct result of the cookie sales.

The cookie sales teach the members valuable lessons, such as financial responsibility, sales tactics, politeness and interacting with adults.

"It's really nice to see girls who can talk with adults comfortably," Bill McLiverty said.

Hannah Grover covers news, arts and religion for The Daily Times. She can be reached at 505-564-4652 and hgrover@daily-times.com. Follow her @hmgrover on Twitter.