In a file photo from Oct. 15, 2013, a public hearing notice is posted in front of the proposed Masada House for men at 2107 Scholfield Lane in Farmington.
In a file photo from Oct. 15, 2013, a public hearing notice is posted in front of the proposed Masada House for men at 2107 Scholfield Lane in Farmington. (The Daily Times file photo)

FARMINGTON — Farmington City Council will meet Tuesday to vote on zoning that would allow a transitional housing program for men to be located in a home on Schofield Lane, an ordinance switching city animal control officers to the police department's supervision and a request to retire old vehicles.

The Planning and Zoning Commission in late October recommended the council approve a requested zoning change and special use permit at 2107 Schofield Lane. Masada House, a transitional housing program for women recovering from substance abuse, applied for the zoning change and permit to open a similar home for men on Schofield Lane.

"We have a severe housing shortage in the city of Farmington, and there's absolutely no transitional housing for men," said Karen Chenault, the organization's program director.

About 60 percent of property owners within 100 feet of the site oppose the zone change, according to the council agenda.

At a Nov. 12 meeting, Councilors Jason Sandel and Mary Fischer said they oppose the special use permit and planned to vote against it.

Council tabled action in the November meeting because Councilor Dan Darnell was absent.

The animal control officer ordinance would relocate the officers from the supervision of the Parks, Recreation and Cultural Affairs department to the police department.

Deputy Chief of Police Keith McPheeters has said the switch would be sensible. Nationally, he has said, most city police departments supervise the officers.

The officers serve a dual role. They respond to animal disturbances and can issue citations, McPheeters has said.

Fischer has opposed the ordinance. She has said the officers functioned well for 30 years while housed under the parks and recreation department.

Also on Tuesday, council may decide on whether to declare 10 vehicles as surplus. Purchasing Officer Edward Smylie said they include a front-end loader, a police car, SUVs and trucks. The vehicles were manufactured between 1996 and 2008, according to the agenda.

"We do this periodically," Smylie said. "We probably have four or five of these a year that we declare surplus and put on our online auction."

Dan Schwartz covers government for The Daily Times. He can be reached at 505-564-4606 and dschwartz@daily-times.com. Follow him @Dan_J_Schwartz on Twitter.