"Flamingo on Watch" by Susan Levin is displayed at the Farmington Civic Center as part of the Four Corners Photographic Society’s winter
"Flamingo on Watch" by Susan Levin is displayed at the Farmington Civic Center as part of the Four Corners Photographic Society's winter show. (Courtesy of Susan Levin)

FARMINGTON — Twice a year, members of the Four Corners Photographic Society show their work at the Farmington Civic Center.

The organization's winter show has started, and a reception is from 1 to 4 p.m. today at the Civic Center.

Mickey Ginn, a former treasurer for the club and long-time club member, said the show will also have People's Choice awards, in which show attendees can vote on their favorite photos.

"This will give us some feedback as artists," Ginn said.

Since joining the club, Ginn can only remember missing one show and he said that was because he was elk hunting.

Ginn, who joined the club after moving to Farmington about 25 years ago, said the club has helped him and other members transition to digital photography.

A photo of a tree taken by Mickey Ginn is displayed at the Farmington Civic Center as part of the Four Corners Photographic Society’s winter show.
A photo of a tree taken by Mickey Ginn is displayed at the Farmington Civic Center as part of the Four Corners Photographic Society's winter show. (Courtesy of Mickey Ginn)

"A lot of the members there are old-timers who started in film photography," he said.

Because of that, one of the former presidents hosted Photoshop workshops while other members hosted workshops on digital photography techniques.

Ginn said being a member of the club provides an opportunity to learn from other people. Plus, he said, the members are eager to teach.

"You learn not just the good things, but the bad things also," Ginn said.

For instance, he said he has learned about good equipment and what to avoid.

In addition to meeting monthly, the club also goes on field trips to various locations, such as Native American ruins and sites to see the spring flowers and autumn leaves.

Ginn said photography is important because it holds memories. He said often after disasters, such as floods or hurricanes, the first things people grab from their houses are photographs.

"It's a moment in time," Ginn said.

Hannah Grover covers news, arts and religion for The Daily Times. She can be reached at 505-564-4652 and hgrover@daily-times.com. Follow her @hmgrover on Twitter.