Kelly Trilli and her husband built their house to take advantage of the western views like the one seen from their kitchen window on Thursday in
Kelly Trilli and her husband built their house to take advantage of the western views like the one seen from their kitchen window on Thursday in Farmington. (Jon Austria/The Daily Times)
IF YOU GO

What: 2013 Home Tour

When: Saturday

Houses

•1011 N. Orchard Drive

•6255 Hood Mesa Trail

• 7310 Tuscany Way

• 5770 Largo Street

Tickets: $10. Can be purchased at any of the four houses during the tour.

More Info: Call Kathy Hooper at 505-860-0511 or Linda Crabtree at 505-793-4392

FARMINGTON — At first glance, the Trilli, Foxwell, Ferguson and Carter houses have nothing in common. The four homes are vastly different in ages, styles and location. But one thing unites them -- they are all featured in the 2013 Home Tour.

The Home Tour is the major fundraiser for the Farmington Women's Club.

The newest house on the tour was finished this month. Located on Tuscany Way, the house belongs to Pat and Kelly Trilli.

"We wanted a house that faced west," Trilli said.

The Trillis built their house with a large patio that faces the setting sun and a balcony on the second story, also looking west. Kelly Trilli said on clear days she can see Angel Peak from her house.

Trilli described her home as a combination of traditional and contemporary.

Her favorite room is the laundry room because it's the "funnest." The room has a barn-door entrance and a black chandelier. The black wall paper is decorated with white flowers and there is a counter on which she folds clothes.

Upstairs a second laundry area is hidden from view behind a barn door painted to look like a picture of flowers.

The sink in one of the two upstairs bathrooms was made using a glass bowl bought from Dillard's. A hole was drilled in the bottom for the drain. Trilli said the bowl cost $50 and provided the clear glass look she wanted.

"You can't get a sink for $50," Kelly Trilli said.

The house, which was started in January, was just finished and the Trillis are now in the process of landscaping it. Trilli said she plans to keep it simple with lawns, a couple of flower beds and some shrubs.

Contrasting the Trilli house in location and age is Sandy Foxwell's home on Orchard Avenue.

Robert and Nedra Ferguson bought an unfinished house three years ago and transformed it into their dream home. Large balconies and patios on the house take
Robert and Nedra Ferguson bought an unfinished house three years ago and transformed it into their dream home. Large balconies and patios on the house take advantage of the views. (Jon Austria/The Daily Times)

Foxwell said her favorite part of being a Coldwell Banker Real Estate agent is seeing all the houses and the different architecture. She enjoys buying homes to fix up. The Orchard house -- which she is now selling for $333,000 -- will be her fourth.

Originally built in 1958, Foxwell said the house hadn't changed much since then. She was attracted to the peaceful nature of the area.

"I just decided that it needed to be someplace that reflects the peace," Foxwell said.

She took the lawn and turned it into a Zen garden, trimming down the juniper tree so that it looks like a bonsai and adding bamboo paneling to the fence.

"It's not a house for everybody," Foxwell cautioned.

She said she doesn't see it as a children's home, but it could be a good fit for a couple of adults who like to entertain.

When she saw it eight years ago, Foxwell said she could see its potential. The house is the fourth home she has fixed up.

"I really think there's not a lot of appreciation for an older home," Foxwell said.

While Foxwell fixed up her home to resell, the Fergusons created their dream house.

In 1934, Nedra Ferguson was born in the adobe house on the southeast corner of Dustin and Ute.

After purchasing her home, Sandy Foxwell replaced the lawn with a Zen garden.
After purchasing her home, Sandy Foxwell replaced the lawn with a Zen garden. (Augusta Liddic/The Daily Times)

As time passed, Nedra Ferguson got married to Robert Ferguson and moved away from Farmington, only to return 41 years later.

"When I sold my business, she wanted to go home," Robert Ferguson said.

The couple began searching for homes and they discovered a partially built house on Hood Mesa Trail. Only the outside walls and guest house were complete.

"When my wife walked up to these doors, she said 'Honey, you shouldn't have brought me here,'" Robert Ferguson said.

From that moment Nedra Ferguson wanted the house and she knew how she was going to finish it and decorate it.

Robert Ferguson also liked the house, but the big attraction for them was the views.

"We've got fantastic views up here from every place," he said.

When looking out the living room windows, on clear days he can see the La Plata Mountains.

Nedra Ferguson would sit out on the patio and take in the vistas.

"Every day she would say, 'Honey, have I told you how much I love my house?'" Robert Ferguson said.

He said Nedra Ferguson used to say it was the most beautiful place.

In 2012, two years after returning to Farmington, her kidneys began to fail. She was admitted to the hospital and later developed pneumonia. On Aug. 28, 2012, after more than 20 days in the hospital, Nedra Ferguson died.

Robert Ferguson decided to participate in the home tour in her memory.

The final home in the tour belongs to Terry and Rose Carter.

The couple were planning to build a house on 20 acres near Aztec, but, after drawing up the plans, they realized it was too expensive. So they traded the land as a down payment for a house on 27 acres on Largo Street.

One of Rose Carter's favorite things about the house is the wildlife.

"The deer are out all the time," she said.

In the winter, the couple have had male deer fighting right outside their dining room window.

In addition to deer, she sees foxes, pheasants, coyotes and turkeys.

However, the inside of the house also attracted Carter.

She said it's a great house with a "phenomenal" movie room and a functional kitchen.

"Those are probably my two favorite rooms," Carter said.

However, the size of the living room shocked her.

"When we first moved in, I was like 'Oh my God, it's like a church," she said.

In order to decorate, Carter looked around at various places. Some of her decor came from Craigslist, like a wooden sculpture of horses that hangs on the wall at the entrance to the hallway.

While most of the decor was purchased after the Carters bought the house, some of it was already there.

A mural in one of the bedrooms tells the house's story. A train represents the location near the railroad. And the owner of Mesa Airlines built it, so the mural is filled with planes.

The 27 acres feature a pavilion with a bathroom, a few ponds full of catfish, a guest cabin and a shop.

Hannah Grover covers news, arts and religion for The Daily Times. She can be reached at 505-564-4652 and hgrover@daily-times.com. Follow her @hmgrover on Twitter.