Farmington — Families and friends crowded into the First United Methodist Church Thursday afternoon for a patriotic Fourth of July concert.

The concert, which has been an annual event for the last few years, featured many local musicians and genres of music.

Musicians took turns in the spotlight, performing American songs. However, not all the featured music was typical patriotic songs. Many performed songs from American genres such as jazz and ragtime.

Hoyle Osborne, a local piano player, performed an original composition entitled "Eutopia."

Audience members watch the Community Choir perform during a patriotic concert on Thursday at First United Methodist Church in Farmington.
Audience members watch the Community Choir perform during a patriotic concert on Thursday at First United Methodist Church in Farmington. (Augusta Liddic The Daily Times)

The Trumpet Geezers played a version of "Over the Rainbow" arranged by a former Trumpet Geezer and Farmington High School teacher Scott Ramsey. The Trumpet Geezers have been performing the song ever since Ramsey died, which was about five years ago. Paul Boyer, a Trumpet Geezers member, said they performed the song at his funeral after finding the arrangement on his computer.

While the Trumpet Geezers played, Amber Swenk sang the lyrics and Edie Farm played the piano.

Don Allen, a bass trombone player, has performed in every concert since the first one about five years ago. He said the concert is an attractive Fourth of July activity partially because it is indoors and cooler. Allen said that, while the first concert was rough, each year has gotten better.

"That's the way traditions happen," Allen said.

A concert highlight was the Four Corners Barbershop Chorus performance of "Armed Forces Medley." Everyone who had served or is enlisted in the military stood when their branch's tune was sung.

John Renner, another of the Trumpet Geezers, stood up. Renner served a total of 22 years in the military, four of which were with the Marines.

During the Vietnam War, Renner was a surgeon.

"A surgeon in the war is not a thing you look back at pleasantly," Renner said. "You have to forget the gory stuff."

Hannah Grover covers news, arts and religion for The Daily Times. She can be reached at 505-564-4652 and hgrover@daily-times.com. Follow her @hmgrover.