Editor:

Wiccans and atheists are less than one percent of the population of the United States. They are not on record as doing any major good in the world. Christians on the other hand are a major religion in this country and are known for their charitable giving and acts around the world. Third world countries are doing better because of them. If they want recognition why don't they put up their own monuments. A suggestion for the atheists a giant zero to represent their belief in nothing. And for the Wiccans, a giant fairy/witch/crystal combo or something like that. Christians stand up before someone does this great country in.

JEAN MUÑOZ

Farmington

 

Editor:

I don't think having the Ten Commandments displayed as a historical document caters to any particular religion. Its a moral statement everyone abides by or at least most people do. This is what our nation was founded on. We can be non-religious or religious. We just can't have a state religion everyone has to obey.

EDITH L. RAY

Bloomfield

Editor:

Kudos to the city of Bloomfield! I commend you for erecting the "Ten Commandments" monument in front of City Hall. I'm appalled that only two people (along with the ACLU) won their case against the city to have it removed. "The Ten Commandments" were written over 2,000 years ago and are part of our world history not just American history. If folks were "offended" by this monument, why didn't they just look the other way? When will it ever stop? Christians are being persecuted everyday and we are losing our freedom every minute. Until this country turns back to God, we will continue to suffer the consequences. I think America has much bigger fish to fry than squabbling over a monument placed in front of a city hall. Look at our world situation and pray for solutions and do something worthy for our soldiers, country, etc.

God Bless the USA!

JANIE VOLKERT

Farmington

 

Editor:

I am deeply disappointed by the lawyers of the ACLU. They have missed some crucially important issues.

The Ten Commandments were written around 3,400 years ago when the Israelites had walked away from slavery in Egypt and needed a code of conduct.

Three of the commandments are an essential part of the foundation of our legal system -- don't lie, steal or commit murder. Others concern healthy relationships with others -- parents, spouses and neighbors. The Israelites also provided one of the first systems of thought that recognized the rights of people who had no power or protections -- widows, orphans, aliens, ... based on their real experience. And it's the one Americans are more familiar with.

So yes, the Ten Commandments is a historical document that sets extraordinarily important precedents for humanity.

So why does the ACLU want to get rid of it -- because it mentions God?

DAISY SWADESH

Farmington